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The Social Life of Pots
Glaze Wares and Cultural Dynamics in the Southwest, AD 1250-1680
By Judith A. Habicht-Mauche; Suzanne L. Eckert; Deborah L. Huntley
376 pp. / 6.00 in x 9.00 in / 2006
Cloth (978-0-8165-2457-0) [s]
  
Related Interest
  - Archaeology
  - Anthropology


The demographic upheavals that altered the social landscape of the Southwest from the thirteenth through the seventeenth centuries forced peoples from diverse backgrounds to literally remake their worlds—transformations in community, identity, and power that are only beginning to be understood through innovations in decorated ceramics. In addition to aesthetic changes that included new color schemes, new painting techniques, alterations in design, and a greater emphasis on iconographic imagery, some of the wares reflect a new production efficiency resulting from more specialized household and community-based industries. Also, they were traded over longer distances and were used more often in public ceremonies than earlier ceramic types. Through the study of glaze-painted pottery, archaeologists are beginning to understand that pots had "social lives" in this changing world and that careful reconstruction of the social lives of pots can help us understand the social lives of Puebloan peoples. In this book, fifteen contributors apply a wide range of technological and stylistic analysis techniques to pottery of the Rio Grande and Western Pueblo areas to show what it reveals about inter- and intra-community dynamics, work groups, migration, trade, and ideology in the precontact and early postcontact Puebloan world. Through material evidence, the contributors reveal that technological and aesthetic innovations were deliberately manipulated and disseminated to actively construct "communities of practice" that cut across language and settlement groups. The Social Life of Pots offers a wealth of new data from this crucial period of prehistory and is an important baseline for future work in this area.


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