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Ask A Mexican Says "Buy this Book!"
October 2014
Gustavo Arellano checked out the new book Our Sacred Maiz is our Mother and he has some advice: "It’s an awesome treatise on the importance of corn in the Americas, combining history with ethnography, cultural studies and a bunch of desmadre. Buy, buy, compra!"

Omnimystery News: A Conversation with Mystery Author Sara Sue Hoklotubbe
October 2014
"We are delighted to welcome author Sara Sue Hoklotubbe to Omnimystery News today. Sara's third mystery in her Sadie Walela series is Sinking Suspicions and we recently had the opportunity to catch up with her to talk about both the book and series."

Reynaldo Reyes Wins 2014 AESA Critics Choice Award

September 2014
Reynaldo Reyes has won a 2014 American Educational Studies Association Critics Choice Award for his book Learning the Possible: Mexican American Students Moving from the Margins of Life to New ways of Being.

AAA: Molly Doane's "Stealing Shining Rivers": Transnational Conservation meets a Mexican Forest
August 2014
"ENGAGEMENT Blog editor Micha Rahder recently caught up with Molly Doane to discuss her recent book, Stealing Shining Rivers and its broader contributions to debates over communal lands, forest conservation, and neoliberal policies. The book recently won “Best book on Mexico in the social sciences” from the Mexico section of the latin American Studies Association (LASA). This interview is the latest in an ENGAGEMENT series that explores how environmental-anthropological book projects have profound and important impacts on the world around us."

Fresno Bee: Author finds Jack Kerouac's 'Mexican girl' lover in Selma
July 2014
"The result is [Tim Z. Hernandez's] seductive and fascinating book "Manana Means Heaven," a blend of fiction and non-fiction, in which we get a version of the "Mexican girl's" story in "On the Road."


Read more here: http://www.fresnobee.com/2014/07/12/4019457/road-taken-with-a-woman-who-became.html#storylink=cpy

Tim Z. Hernandez Wins Two Prestigous Awards
July 2014
In 2013, Tim Z. Hernandez released two books. Both have garnered numerious reviews and top awards, most recently a Colorado Book Award and an International Latino Book Award.

AZ Star: The Seri Language of the Sea
June 2014
"Cathy Moser Marlett spent her childhood darting barefoot up and down Mexican beaches, catching clams or octopuses stranded on the shore at low tide."

Cathy Moser Marlett Discusses Her Childhood Among the Seri
June 2014
In this video Cathy Moser Marlett talks about the researching and writing of Shells on a Desert Shore, a definitive, irreplaceable work in ethnography and a unique time capsule of the Seri people and their connection to the sea.

Tim Hernandez Wins 2014 Colorado Book Award
June 2014
Poetry
Natural Takeover of Small Things by Tim Z. Hernandez (The University of Arizona Press)

"Leaving Tusla" Named to PEN Open Book Award Short List
June 2014
The PEN American Center announed their finalists, and included on the list is our own Jennifer Elise Foerster's new collection Leaving Tulsa. Winners of the awards will be announced on July 30th and honored at the PEN Literary Awards Ceremony on September 29th at The New School in New York City. Congratulations to all the finalists!

AZ Star: Hot Off the Press! New Releases from the University of Arizona Press
June 2014
"It’s nearly summer, but the academic calendar is still heating up. The University of Arizona Press has a strong slate of new releases for anyone interested in topics from global conservation efforts to poetry and performance. As a scholarly press, the mission is to publish books of lasting value."

Western Avenue and Other Fictions by Fred Arroyo Shortlisted for Saroyan Prize
May 2014
What a week! First the PEN Literary Awards and now Fred Arroyo has made the William Saroyan Prize shortlist for his 2012 Western Avenue and Other Fictions. The award is intended to encourage new or emerging writers and honor the Saroyan literary legacy of originality, vitality and stylistic innovation. The Saroyan Prize recognizes newly published works of both fiction and non-fiction. The judges are particularily interested in writing in the Saroyan tradition: memoirs, portraits and excursions into neighborhood and community.

Jim and Marilyn Johnson Discuss Arizona Legend Ted De Grazia
May 2014
In this video, co-authors Jim and Marilyn Johnson talk about the making of their book, the first ever comprehensive biography of artist and Tucson legend Ted De Grazia. Filmed on location at the De Grazia Gallery in the Sun in Tucson, Arizona.

Leaving Tulsa named to PEN Open Book 2014 Award Long List
May 2014
This is the first year that PEN is releasing the longlisted titles of its book awards while also celebrating the many distinugished awards judges who nominated them. This year, with the help of its partners and supporters, PEN will confer 18 distinct awards, fellowships, grants, and prizes, and confer nearly $150,000 to some of the most gifted writers and translators working today. The shortlists will be announced on June 17th. Winners for all 2014 PEN Literary Awards will be announced on July 30th.

AZ Star: Tucson Couple's Book Paints Portrait of DeGrazia
April 2014
"Did you ever wonder why anyone decides to write a biography of a particular person? What piques a writer’s curiosity enough to spend months or even years meticulously researching every detail of that person’s life? I got at least one answer a few weeks ago while attending a Friday evening book review featuring authors James and Marilyn Johnson speaking on their recently published “DeGrazia: The Man and the Myths” (The University of Arizona Press, February 2014)."

NBC News: Lation Lens: Feminist Poet Draws Praise for New Book
April 2014
"Poet and essayist Carmen Giménez Smith knew she wanted to be writer at a very early age. “I was a big bookworm,” she says. “I would get books at thrift stores and garage sales. I'd just read anything I could get my hands on. I loved it, and I loved the world that it created. And I said, 'I want to do that. I want to create these worlds.”

NPR: Lending Circles Help Latinas pay Bills and Invest

April 2014
Carlos Vélez-Ibáñez, an anthropologist at Arizona State University who wrote a book about tandas, says that's pretty rare. "In the United States there is such emphasis given to individuality and individuation and individual success," he says. "The bottom line is trust. They can't believe people trust each other." Vélez-Ibáñez says newly arrived Mexican immigrants have to trust each other for survival. Their neighbors and co-workers are also their mechanics, seamstresses, baby sitters, interpreters. He says these social connections are critical, especially for those who are undocumented or can't speak English.

AZ Star: Local Voices: Native American Author and UA Professor Frances Washburn
March 2014
"Frances Washburn got her literary start reading the neighbor boys’ unwanted comic books. In her newest book, “The Red Bird All-Indian Traveling Band,” Washburn follows a young, American Indian woman and her band as a mysterious murder rocks the reservation.

NPR: Troncoso Family Finds Success On U.S. Side Of Border With Mexico
March 2014
"We look out from a mountain over El Paso and Juarez, two big cities stitched together. But it makes a huge difference which side of the border you're on. We visit the Troncoso family, whose lives completely changed when they crossed a quarter mile into the U.S. many years ago, and moved into a modest improvised home in a colonia, or informal neighborhood, by the Rio Grande. Their sons became a Yale professor and novelist, and a high school principal."

KJZZ: Arizona Artist Celebrated in New Book
March 2014
"Ted DeGrazia was born in 1909 in the Arizona mining town of Morenci. Journalists Jim and Marilyn Johnson chronicle DeGrazia’s life in their new book "DeGrazia: The Man and the Myths."

Tucson Weekly: Q & A with Augustine Romero and Julio Cammarota
March 2014
"A new book published by University of Arizona Press, Raza Studies: The Public Option for Educational Revolution edited by Augustine Romero and Julio Cammarota is needed. It tells the program's origin story without malice or pretense or even hiding from its ties to the UA's Social Justice and Education Program. Really, we've had so many outsiders come in, interfere in the movement, try to take some ownership over what was built, dismantled and fought for, seems like a book with truth behind it is needed now more than ever."

AZ Star: A New Defense of Mexican-American Studies

March 2014
"Julio Cammarota, an associate professor of Mexican-American Studies at the UA, and Augustine Romero, TUSD’s director of multicultural curriculum, will discuss their new book, “Raza Studies: The Public Option for Educational Revolution,” a solid defense of Mexican-American Studies and a critical response to critics and bashers.

Arizona Illustrated: New Book is First Comprehensive Biography of Ted DeGrazia
February 2014
"A new book, "DeGrazia: The Man and the Myths," is the first comprehensive biography to be written about Arizona artist Ted DeGrazia. In the beginning of the book, authors - James and Marilyn Johnson - said looking for information of DeGrazia, the man, was a "biographer's nightmare." And both explain it is because he was a very private person, who many times invented lies and myths in order to hide the real man behind the artist."

Buckmaster Show: New Book Tackles myths Surround Legendary Tucson Artists Ted DeGrazia
February 2014
"Today on Buckmaster -  We talk with James and Marilyn Johnson, co-authors of a new book titled DeGrazia, The Man and The Myths."

AZ Star: New Book Explores the Many Layers of Ted DeGrazia
February 2014
"When James W. Johnson met the lover of the late artist Ted DeGrazia in a parking lot, he knew little about the man or his art. Johnson first visited the DeGrazia Gallery in the Sun four years ago for a concert by Spanish guitarist Domingo DeGrazia. By accident, he, along with his wife, Marilyn D. Johnson, arrived two hours early. It was enough time for DeGrazia’s reputation to capture the Johnsons’ attention and inspire the book De Grazia: The Man and the Myths.”

ALA Round Table Names Two UA Press Books to Top Ten List
January 2014
The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table of the American Library Association has named two UA Press books to it's top ten 2014 list. The titles are Coconut Milk by Dan Taulapapa McMullin and Red-Inked Retablos by Rigoberto Gonzalez.

Southwest Books of the Year Award Winners
January 2014
What a great way to start the New Year! Three press titles were included in the annual Southwest Books of the Year competition, run by our friends at the Pima County Public Library. Baja California Missions by David Burckhalter with photos by David Burckhalter and Mina Sedgwick was named to the Best Reading 2013 list, while At the Border of Empires by Andrae M. Marak and Laura Tuennerman and Mapping Wonderlands by Dori Griffin were called out by the panel's prestigous readers as best books.

CHOICE Magazine Names Four UA Press Titles to the "Best of the Best"
January 2014
Four Press titles were chosen by CHOICE Magazine as Outstanding Academic Titles. Selected from more than 25,000 titles submitted for review in 2013, the books on this list truly are the “best of the best.”

Salon.com: What to Read Awards names "Manana Means Heaven" Best of 2013
December 2013
Tim Z. Hernandez's novel Manana Means Heaven is really striking a chord with readers and critics. It has been named by some well-regarded critics as a Best Book of 2013. Rigoberto González named it to his list published on Salon.com's "What to Read Awards: Top critics choose the best books of 2013." 

PRI: Names Mañana Means Heaven as a 2013 must-read
December 2013
"Okay, I had to read this book so I could interview the author. But I must admit that I don’t always love the books I’m asked to read. This is a great story about a few weeks in the life of American author Jack Kerouac, told from the perspective of “The Mexican girl.” She’s a character who occupies about 20 pages in Kerouac’s famed “On the Road.” Hernandez spent years tracking down “Terry” from the novel, the real life Bea Franco, and hours interviewing her. He weaves together the facts of Bea’s life along with letters found in a Kerouac archive, and the story from “On the Road.” It’s wonderfully written and a lovely conceit."- Aaron Schachter

2013 New Mexico-Arizona Book Award Winners
December 2013
Congratulations to Mary Irish who won best gardening book for A Place All Our Own and to Thomas E. Sheridan for best history book on Arizona for Arizona: A History.

PRI's The World: A Novelist finds 'the Mexican Girl'
November 2013
"But aside from those few letters, kept at the New York City Public Library, nothing else was known about the mysterious Mexican girl — named Bea Franco in real life.  That is, until poet Tim Z. Hernandez took it upon himself to find her. "Holding those letters, I realized this was a real person and I wanted to know more about her," said Hernandez.

Poet dg nanouk okpik Receives 2013 American Book Award
November 2013
"Congratulations to dg nanouk okpik, named 2013 American Book Award winner from the Before Columbus Foundation! We're proud to be the publisher of her collection Corpse Whale."

AZ Star: New Beer Book Taps AZ Brewing History
October 2013
"Arizona’s long and storied commercial beer brewing history got its start in Tucson, according to Ed Sipos. The Scottsdale resident, author of the new book “Brewing Arizona: A Century of Beer in the Grand Canyon State,” gives credit to Alexander Levin, a German immigrant who established the Pioneer Brewery here in 1864, 11 years after the region was acquired as part of the Gadsden Purchase.

AZ Republic: 'Brewing Arizona' Serves Up History
October 2013
"It’s no mystery that the craft-beer explosion has taken over the state in the past decade, with about 50 breweries open and many more in the works. All of this is documented in detail, and more, in the first comprehensive book about the state’s beer industry, “Brewing Arizona.” Written by Ed Sipos, a past president of the A-1 Chapter of the Brewery Collectibles Club of America and a jeweler in his day job, the coffee-table book is the effort of more than 15 years of research and a thirst for knowledge."

LA Times Books: 'Manana Means Heaven' revisits 'On the Road' tryst
September 2013
"Like most of the characters in "On the Road," "Terry" was based on a real person. Bea Franco was her name, and she was the daughter of farm-working Mexican immigrants. In his poignant new novel "Mañana Means Heaven," the San Joaquin Valley-raised poet Tim Z. Hernandez reconstructs Franco's life and her passionate, life-changing encounter with the famous writer in autumn 1947."

The Nation: Carmen Giménez Smith
September 2013
"Milk & Filth, by Carmen Giménez Smith, is a sharp, feminist manifesto by way of poetry collection. Or that’s how I read it. We bring what we bring to the reading experience. These poems are political and personal in the same breath. She takes on motherhood and cultural expectations placed upon women and what we consume and how what we consume shapes us."

Edible Baja Arizona: Brewing Arizona

September 2013
"Arizona history always delivers colorful characters and stories; the history of beer brewing makes no exception. Although Arizonans historically lacked the resources for brewing beer—water, grain, bottles, yeasts—when people arrived to the Southwest from elsewhere—the East Coast, Europe, California—they brought their beer-brewing habits with them and made do. Brewing Arizona is a thorough chronicle of beer brewing in the Grand Canyon State, documenting crude and craft beers alike."

Congratulations to Sara Seager, 2013 MacArthur Fellow
September 2013
Sara Seager, astrophysicist and professor of planetary science and physics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was named to the 2013 class of MacArthur Fellows. She is the editor of the press's 2011 book Exoplanets, which is part of the University of Arizona Press's highly regarded Space Science Series. See the complete story at macfound.org.

AP Review: Kerouac's 'Mexican Girl' brought to life
August 2013
"Kerouac scholars knew she was a woman named Bea Franco, but despite many efforts over the fog of years, none could find her. Until now. Tim Z. Hernandez, an award-winning author and poet, spent years building and sifting through a list of nearly 200 Bea Francos across the United States, searching for the one whose brief romance with a young, wandering writer was immortalized in the book that defined the Beat Generation. As chance would have it, Hernandez found her living in his native San Joaquin Valley barely a mile from his own home."

Publisher's Weekly: Milk and Filth by Carmen Giménez Smith
August 2013
"With her brazen and mordant voice, Giménez Smith generously deploys physical—often violent—imagery to challenge classist, consumerist, and socially polite forms of feminism in the interest of “all the bodies strewn over history and semi-emerging from the earth.” Departing from “a feral/ undergrowth that marks/ me as burial site” Giménez Smith traverses fable, manifesto, and the lyrical to exhume the familial, cultural, intellectual, and artistic inheritances at work in and on the poet...” (Oct.)" Click the link to learn more about the new collection Milk and Filth by Carmen Giménez Smith.

Associated Press: Beatrice Kozera, known as 'Terry' In Kerouac's 'On the Road,' dies at 92
August 2013
"Beatrice Kozera, the Los Angeles-born woman whose fleeting relationship with novelist Jack Kerouac was chronicled in “On the Road,” has died. She was 92. The woman also known as Bea Franco and to readers as “Terry, the Mexican girl” died Thursday in Lakewood of natural causes, family friend Tim Hernandez said Monday. Hernandez tracked down Kozera while he was researching her story for a book due to be released later this month called Manana Means Heaven."

UA News: AZ State Museum Launches Database of Southwest Textiles
July 2013
A new database from the UA's Arizona State Museum has made the Joe Ben Wheat Southwest Textile Database available for searching. Wheat is the author of "Blanket Weaving in the Southwest."

Words With Writers: Interview with Writer Jennifer Elise Foerster
July 2013
"(An introduction to Jennifer Elise Foerster, author of the debut poetry book Leaving Tulsa). In a discussion of how and why she writes, Foerster described the magic of writing: “The mind is a great labyrinth, and when I write I feel like I’m in the labyrinth.” Foerster holds an MFA in Writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts and a BFA from the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She has received numerous fellowships and was Wallace Stegner Fellow in Poetry at Stanford University. Foerster’s poems have been anthologized in SingNew California Writing 2011, and Turtle Island to Abya Yala..."

Tucson Weekly: Dry World
July 2013
"Edited by UA faculty members Ellen McMahon, Ander Monson and Beth Weinstein and published recently by the UA Press, Ground/Water is the first volume of the Confluencenter's Confluence Beyond Boundaries series. The book, itself a beautiful object, is the result of a series of collaborations between UA faculty and students and the Rillito River Project, a Tucson-based arts group. It contains an array of essays, poems, photographs, graphic design projects and architectural proposals inspired by the Rillito."

NPR: Tess Taylor on Jennifer Foerster
June 2013
"For a book that unfurled like a wild, restless road trip, I took great delight in Jennifer Foerster's Leaving Tulsa. Sensuous, generous, full of beginnings and endings, this map of America flapping in the dark meditates on Foerster's Muskegee ancestry, the American prairie, the loss of her grandmother's land, and her shard-like rediscovery in California."

Latin Pulse: Jon Wolseth discusses Honduras
June 2013
Latin Pulse is a great source for critical commentary on news and public affairs in Latin America. A recent episode looks at a controversial gang truce in Honduras. Author Jon Wolseth discussing the truth and his book Jesus and the Gang: Youth Violence and Christianity in Urban Honduras in the June 7 epsode.

Author Molly Doane wins best book award from LASA Mexico
June 2013
At this year's Latin American Studies Association's (LASA) 2013 International Congress author Molly Doane's new book Stealing Shining Rivers: Agrarian Conflict, Market Logic, and Conservation in a Mexican Forestwas selected as the best book on Mexico in the social sciences published in 2012. Doane was honored at the LASA Mexico Section's annual business meeting, held in Washigton DC in conjunction with the congress.

Los Angeles Review of Books: Daniel Olivas interviews Gabriella Gutierrez y Muhs
May 2013
Helena Maria Viramontes is the author of The Moths and Other Stories (Arte Público Press, 1985), followed by two novels, Under the Feet of Jesus (Dutton, 1995), and Their Dogs Came With Them (Atria Books, 2008). Her fiction is rooted in an East Los Angeles childhood during the volatile 1960s and 1970s, which imbued her with a deep desire to give voice to Chicanas and Mexican women whose lives are too often marginalized or — worse yet — altogether ignored. Despite receiving critical acclaim, including comparisons to John Steinbeck and Upton Sinclair, there has never been a single scholarly volume dedicated to Viramontes’s stories and novels. Gabriella Gutiérrez y Muhs has changed that with the recent publication of Rebozos de Palabras: An Helena Maria Viramontes Critical Reader.

Luci Tapahonso Named as Navajo Nation's First Poet Laureate
May 2013
Elmer Guy, president of Navajo Technical College, announced the appointment of Luci Tapahonso as the Navajo Nation’s first Poet Laureate. Tapahonso will officially assume her role for the two-year position at the college’s commencement ceremonies on May 17, Guy said in revealing the award.

Author Frances L. Ramos wins prestigious award
April 2013
Dr. Frances L. Ramos, assistant professor of Latin American history at the University of South Florida, is the winner of the Michael C. Meyer Award for her 2012 book Identity, Ritual, and Power in Colonial Puebla published by the University of Arizona Press.

Indian Country Today: You Can't Convey What You Don't Have
April 2013
In an essay titled "You Can't Convey What You Don't Have," C. Timothy McKeown, author of "In the Smaller Scope of Conscience," questions the upcoming auction of Native masks in Paris in an editorial on Indian Country Today Media Network.

Author Daniel Herman wins prestigious award
March 2013
Dr. Daniel Herman, professor of history at Central Washington University, is the winner of the 5th Labriola Center National Book Award for his 2012 book Rim Country Exodus: A Story of Conquest, Renewal, and Race in the Making published by the University of Arizona Press.

'Last Water' co-authors filmed by C-Span
March 2013
Hundreds of festival attendees crowded the Gallagher Theater to hear the authors and ask questions. C-Span was there to cover it. Co-authors Bill Broyles, Gayle Harrison Hartmann, and Thomas Sheridan, talked about their book Last Water on the Devil’s Highway: A Cultural and Natural History of Tinajas Atlas. The book examines the human and natural history of The Devil’s Highway, or El Camino del Diablo. Follow the link to watch their discussion.

Providence Journal: R.I.'s Cobb garners Best Western long Novel for 'With Blood in Their Eyes'
March 2013
"Retired Rhode Island College professor Thomas Cobb corralled the 2013 Spur Award for Best Western Long Novel for his "With Blood in Their Eyes," his second award from the Western Writers of America."

Inside Higher Ed: Interview with Reynaldo Reyes III about 'Learning the Possible'
March 2013
"In his new book Learning the Possible: Mexican American Students Moving from the Margins of Life to New Ways of BeingReynaldo Reyes III charts the progress of five participants in the College Assistance Migrant Program, a federally funded program for students from a low-income and/or migrant backgrounds enrolled in their first year of higher education. The students described in Reyes's book attended the CAMP program at a rural Colorado community college that he does not name in the book (the college's anonymity was a requirement for gaining access to the students he follows). Those Reyes follows, whose names have been changed, faced a variety of disadvantages going in, including difficulties with English, unplanned motherhood, and criminal backgrounds."

Forthcoming Documentary includes Interview with Thomas Cobb
March 2013
"In fall 2013, filmmaker Cameron Trejo will release a documentary about the Power affair, the deadly southern Arizona shootout that forms the backbone of With Blood in Their Eyes. The documentary will include an interview with the book's author Thomas Cobb. Just in time for the Tucson Festival of Books, Trejo shared a trailer for the film with us."

University of Arizona Press Poets to be Featured in Landmark Symposium
March 2013
Poets House, the most comprehensive open-stacks collection of poetry in the US, to offer Native Innovation: Indigenous American Poetry in the 21st Century, a landmark symposium bringing together a new generation of Native American poets.

LaBloga: Rigoberto González to receive Barnes & Nobles Writers for Writers Award
February 2013
"It has just been announced that Rigoberto González is to receive a Barnes & Noble Writers for Writers Award at the Poets & Writers’ annual dinner, In Celebration of Writers, on Monday, March 18, 2013, in New York City."

Poets & Writers: Writers for Writers Awards
February 2013
"Established in 1996, the Barnes & Noble Writers for Writers Awards celebrate authors who have given generously to other writers or to the broader literary community. Nominations are solicited from past winners, other prominent writers, members of the publishing community, and Poets & Writers' Board and staff. These nominations are reviewed and winners selected by a committee comprised of current and past members of the Board of Directors. Title of the award has been given to Barnes & Noble in appreciation of their extraordinary support of Poets & Writers. Recipients of the 2013 Writers for Writers Award are Steve Berry, Rigoberto González, and Judith Kelman. The awards will be presented at Poets & Writers’ annual dinner, In Celebration of Writers, on Monday, March 18, 2013 in New York City."

Poets & Writers: Tim Z. Hernandez Reads Poems
February 2013
Poets & Writers Magainze recently featured Tim Z. Hernandez reading poems from his collection Natural Takeover of Small Things. The poems "Home" and "Brown Christ" are a wonderful introduction to this talented poet.

Arizona Star: California Poet Laureate helps People Find Distinctive Voice
February 2013
"Juan Felipe Herrera first encountered his voice after singing in front of his third-grade class. His teacher pulled him aside: "You have a beautiful voice." Herrera, the son of California migrant workers, is committed to giving voice to the overlooked through poetry and prose, often mixing languages to do that. "Half of the World in Light: New and Selected Poems" gathers some of Herrera's writings on the experiences of Mexican-Americans. Published by the University of Arizona Press in 2008 as part of the Camino del Sol series, the book won the National Book Critics Circle Award. Herrera's new work, "Senegal Taxi," to be published in March, explores violence in Sudan and is part of the same series by the UA Press."

Indian Country Today: Heid E. Erdrich's "Cell Traffic" as Metaphor and Poetry
January 2013
"Ojibwe poet Heid E. Erdrich tackles a big canvas with her new and selected poems, Cell Traffic (University of Arizona Press, 2012). Laden with potential metaphor, “cell traffic” also has a physical meaning. It refers to a process in which actual cells of the mother move into the child and vice versa. Ancestral inheritance and indigenousness, check!"

Arizona Republic: Poet in Obama Inauguration Reflects Changing US
January 2013
"The UA Press published Inaugural Poet Richard Blanco's second book, "Directions to the Beach of the Dead," in 2005 as part of its Camino del Sol series. The series is among the first and longest-running in the nation that specializes in Latina and Latino writers and is "one of the best known," said Kristen Buckles, the Camino del Sol acquiring editor."

Washington Post: Richard Blanco Recites 2013 Inaugural Poem
January 2013
Video of poet Richard Blanco reciting his poem "One Today." Cuban-American poet Blanco delivered the inaugural poem at the 57th presidential inauguration on Monday. Blanco is the youngest inaugural poet and the first Hispanic poet to recite a poem at the swearing-in ceremony.

Poet Richard Blanco Selected as the 2013 Inaugural Poet
January 2013
"Congratulations to Richard Blanco, named 2013 Inaugural Poet! We're proud to be the publisher of his collection Directions to the Beach of the Dead. The inauguration ceremony will be held January 21. Listen to NPR's interview with Richard Blanco here."

Emily Wakild Wins Two Important Awards
January 2013
"We are so pleased to annouce that Emily L. Wakild, professor of history at Boise State University, has received this year's Elinor Melville Prize for Latin American Environmental History from the Conference on Latin American History for her book Revolutionary Parks: Conservation, Social Justice, and Mexico's National Parks, 1910-1940. The book has also been selected as the 2013 recipient of the Charles A. Weyerhaeuser book award for the best book in forest or conservation history from The Forest History Society."

NPR 2013 Poetry Preview: Juan Felipe Herrera's Senegal Taxi
January 2013
"Juan Felipe Herrera, though the author of many books and long considered an important writer, had his reputation sealed when he won the National Book Critics Circle Award for his selected poems Half of the World in Light. His follow-up is this startling new collection of poems in prose and verse in which he adopts the voices of those suffering through or perpetrating the violence that has racked Sudan. With unrelenting intensity and compassion, Herrera speaks in the voices of traumatized, Senegal-bound children whose "mud drawings" he narrates in a sequence spread throughout the book..."

Southwest Books of the Year: Three UA Press Books Honored
December 2012
Three University of Arizona Press books have been selected as Southwest Books of the Year by the Pima County Public Library. They include With Blood in their Eyes by Thomas Cobb, Arizona: A History by Thomas E. Sheridan, and Last Water on the Devil's Highway by Bill Broyles, Gayle Harrison Hartmann, Thomas E. Sheridan, Gary Paul Nabhan, and Mary Charolotte Thurtle.

Kirkus Names "From this Wicket Patch of Dust" to Top 100
December 2012
Congratulations to author Sergio Troncoso, whose novel "From This Wicked Patch of Dust," was named one of the 2012 Best Indie Books by Kirkus Reviews.

Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education: Camino del Sol Celebrates Latino Writers
December 2012
"Recently, the magazine Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education published an in-depth look at the University of Arizona Press's outstanding series Camino del Sol (CDS). With interviews with series' authors Rigoberto González and Juan Felipe Herrera, as well as UA Press staffers, the article highlights the important role CDS has played in furthering Latino literature: After almost 20 years of publishing Latino works, CDS has helped create an environment in which Latino authors stand side by side with authors of all walks of life. They've also helped give Latino readers a sense of pride and place..."

Woordcraft Season's Readings 2012
December 2012
Sing, The American Cafe, and Sovereign Erotics were all named top choices for 2012 reads!

UANews: Kathryn Conrad Appointed UA Press Director
November 2012
"Kathryn Conrad, formerly interim director of the University of Arizona Press, has been appointed director of the University's nonprofit publisher of scholarly and regional books.“Kathryn brings extensive scholarly publishing experience, an in-depth knowledge of the UA’s unique areas of scholarly excellence and an understanding of the synergistic opportunities that academic libraries and scholarly presses share,” said Carla Stoffle, the University Libraries dean."

Kansas City Star: Top 100 Books of 2012
November 2012
Red Weather, Cell Traffic, and Western Avenue and Other Fictions were all recently named top books of 2012 by the Kansas City Star.

Press Author Wins 2012 Willa Award
November 2012
"Congratulations to Sara Sue Hoklototubbe, who is this year's winner of the 2012 Willa Award in original softcover fiction for her book "The American Cafe." The Willa awards are named for writer Willa Cather, and honor outstanding literature feature women's stories set in the West."

New Mexico-Arizona Book Award Winners
November 2012
"Congratulations to all this winners of this year's New Mexico-Arizona Book Award winners. Special recognition to Edward de Steiguer, author ofWild Horses of the West; Bill Broyles and Diane E. Boyer, editors of Field Man: Life as a Desert Archaeologist; and Sara Sue Hoklotubbe, author of The American Cafe for winning!"

Review: "Natural Takeover of Small Things" by Tim Z. Hernandez
November 2012
"Tim Z. Hernandez is a critically acclaimed poet, author, and performance artist. With his newest endeavor, Natural Takeover of Small Things, he gives us a glimpse into the world of the San Joaquin Valley and the people that reside in this locality. The author uses his unique use of prose poetry to entice the reader into his view of that world...."

Review: A Place All our Own on Cureledup.com
October 2012
"It's wonderful when someone has one great talent, and even better when she has two. For all I know, consummate gardener Mary F. Irish, who is also a writer (Gardening in the DesertAgaves, Yuccas and Related Plants, etc) has other creative abilities. She claims she can’t draw, can barely scrawl her name. But it's certain that she is a masterful gardener and an intelligent, evocative author who makes her plants come alive on the page..."

Poetry Foundation: Heid E. Erdrich’s "Cell Traffic" makes Weekly Best Seller List
October 2012
"...New to the list this week is Heid E. Erdrich’s Cell Traffic: New and Selected Poems debuting at #21. About this new collection her publisher writes: “Erdrich’s new work reflects her continuing concerns with the tensions between science and tradition, between spirit and body. She finds surprising common ground while exploring indigenous experience in multifaceted ways: personal, familial, biological, and cultural.”

AZPM: Author Thomas Cobb visits UA Bookstore
October 2012
"Thomas Cobb received the first MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Arizona. He also holds a bachelors and masters degree from from the U of A. He received a Ph.D. from the University of Houston, where he studied with the postmodern writer Donald Barthelme. A lifelong academic, he taught English for more than 40 years at universities as well as prisons. He lives in Rhode Island. Cobb returned to the University of Arizona campus to read from his new book. In September, the University of Arizona Press published With Blood in Their Eyes based on a deadly shootout in Graham County in 1918. He calls the book a..."

UA News: Education Faculty Member Earns Fulbright
October 2012
"Norma González, a UA professor of language, reading and culture, is studying the effect of cross-border migrations into Mexico on schools. Her research is timely. Schools along the U.S.-Mexico border are grappling with how to best serve a population of English speaking students who often are U.S. citizens and do not necessarily have educational and social contexts rooted in Mexico. González is the author of "I Am my Language" from the University of Arizoan Press...."

NPR Book Review: "With Blood in Their Eyes"
October 2012
"Melissa Block, Host: Writer Thomas Cobb may be best known for his novel "Crazy Heart," it went on to become an acclaimed movie starring Jeff Bridges as a country music singer who's seen far better days. Now Cobb is out with a new novel called "With Blood in Their Eyes." Our reviewer Alan Cheuse says it's a Western worth reading...."

UA Press Authors Works Revived by Journalists Through HB2281 Controversy
September 2012
"In 2004 The University of Arizona Press published a collection of short stories called Chicano Sketches by Tucson author Mario Suárez, 6 years after his death. Suárez's work is gaining attention again because of a law that was once House Bill 2281, used to shut down Mexican American studies (MAS) classes from the Tucson Unified School District. His stories were revived in a reading last summer organized by local journalists to protest the removal of Mexican American literature from TUSD classrooms where MAS was taught...."

Water Along the Devil's Highway
September 2012
"Written by an expert cast of UA affiliates and well-known Tucsonans, the new book Last Water Along Devil's Highway is perfect for desert aficionados and armchair explorers wishing to learn more about the High Tanks, the iconic natural watering holes of southwestern Arizona. Published in collaboration with the University of Arizona Southwest Center, scholars Bill Broyles, Gayle Harrison Hartmann (Arizona State Museum), Thomas E. Sheridan, Gary Paul Nabhan (Southwest Center) and Mary Charlotte Thurtle share the story of Tinajas Altas, the most famous watering holes along the treacherous Devil's Highway..."

Eyewitness News 12 WPRI: Thomas Cobb talks 'With Blood in Their Eyes'
September 2012
"Local author Thomas Cobb is known for his success with the book Crazy Heart, which was also made into a critically-acclaimed film. In Cobb's newest book, With Blood in Their Eyes , he takes on a historical event that tells the tale of the American West. Cobb joined The Rhode Show to talk more about the book.

Full Stop Reviews: Walking the Clouds
September 2012
"For the geeky Indian tired of reading and watching science fiction about white heroes conquering red planets, Walking the Clouds: An Anthology of Indigenous Science Fiction is what the recent release ofThe New Yorker Science Fiction Issue was for other nerdy types–the validation of something that has for too long been ignored..."

Juan Felipe Herrera at the 2012 Poets Forum
September 2012
"The sixth annual Poets Forum will be held on October 18 - 20, 2012, on the campuses of New York University and The New School. From the Forum's dynamic kick-off reading by the Academy's fifteen Chancellors, which includes UA Press author Juan Felipe Herrera to..."

DC Spotlight: Books to Know--Top 10 List
August 2012
From This Wicked Patch of Dust by Sergio Troncoso. "Mexican couple, Pilar and Cuauhtémoc, settle in a shantytown on the border of El Paso, Texas, with the hope of providing a better life for their four children. The novel, deemed a Notable Book by Southwest Books of the Year, follows the family's story as the children pull away from their roots. The message is an enduring picture of the immigrant experience and the price of success...."

Bomb: Roberto Tejada
August 2012
"The lobby of the Hotel María Cristina–a respectable Mexico City establishment of moderate price and convenient location, just off the central artery of the Paseo de la Reforma, and across from the tourist area, once chic, now shabby, but not quite shabby chic, known as the Zona Rosa– is an unlikely occasion for rhapsody. It does boast a rather lovely tiled spiral staircase, but not much else of great note. The place is spacious, clean, and well-maintained; the style of its wooden furniture, heavy and ornate, hovers between vaguely colonial and decimonónico. Rhapsody comes into the picture because it was there, one evening in the fall of 1989, that I arranged to meet Roberto Tejada, whom a mutual friend had said I should get to know during my year in Mexico City...."

Independent Publisher: UA Press Finding Success Where Others Crumble
August 2012
"The University of Arizona Press (the UA Press) is a university press with its head way above water as it continues to thrive in today's publishing market and economy. By continually expanding its catalog with quality works about Arizona and the Southwest borderlands — and with the awards to prove it — the UA Press has shown that it isn't going anywhere...."

Tucson Weekly: Our Endless Folly: The revised 'Arizona: A History' tells the definitive story of our state
July 2012
"There's an adage that those who don't study history are doomed to repeat it. Well, we sure as hell don't read history in this state, and we'll be studying even less in the future now that we've gutted our education system. But before it's too late, read Thomas E. Sheridan's newly revised (and by turns utterly riveting, sometimes horrifying and completely satisfying) Arizona: A History. You'll learn that the real back story of our state..."

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